Editgroup Diffeditgroup_kdpvuc5ogvdpnc5k45vvqmtsqi

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Description Automated import of Datacite DOI metadata, harvested from REST API

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agent fatcat_tools.DataciteImporter
git_rev v0.3.1-242-gb3076c6

Release Edit Diffs (50)


Revision: 015b6181-2f05-4243-88db-5f84b0a88490
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/015b6181-2f05-4243-88db-5f84b0a88490.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,41 @@
+title = "Biosolids in BC's Southern Interior : a case study on public risk perception and factors influencing public attitudes"
+work_id = "mv2fha72incdnpur2tbehtn37y"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "S. Whitehouse"
+given_name = "S."
+surname = "Whitehouse"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "L. Fraser"
+given_name = "L."
+surname = "Fraser"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "P. Tsigaris"
+given_name = "P."
+surname = "Tsigaris"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "029f63a7c5fc3f622ef3a1ee73a79c77e63a604d"
+content = "The land application of biosolids continues to be subject to questions and concerns. A gap exists between public perception of biosolids and the promotion of the safety and sustainability of current waste management practices that convert sewage sludge to biosolids. Within the Southern Interior of BC, there is opposition amongst a segment of the population regarding the land application of biosolids. Through a mail-out survey, the communities of Kamloops, Merritt and Princeton were assessed to gain a better understanding of public perceptions of biosolids risks and factors which influence public attitudes towards biosolids management. Two thousand surveys were distributed proportionately between the communities. Response rates for Kamloops and Merritt were 22 and 24 percent respectively. Surprisingly no responses were received from Princeton. Kamloops and Merritt generally identified differing risk perceptions around the management of biosolids, where Kamloops was found to be more accepting in their overall perceptions. This is a likely result of Merritt residents' recent experience with application sites and proximity to biosolids projects, and the associated local media attention. Results from Kamloops highlighted there is general support to find a productive use of biosolids, but a lack the overall trust necessary for a biosolids project to receive stable community support."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374940"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 3284503e-f8cf-4e97-9d56-51b8a97c229f
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/3284503e-f8cf-4e97-9d56-51b8a97c229f.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "Canadian Pacific letter card"
+work_id = "tk25dmy7wvcrlopo3sacvnmise"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "37bd0be216906d71f736885672907a3cba0b8d6d"
+content = "Letter card from the Empress of Scotland, from Mary Helen to Mother and Dad."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374904"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 440cefac-76de-4cd4-991b-4e4da0419e4c
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/440cefac-76de-4cd4-991b-4e4da0419e4c.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "Medical examination card"
+work_id = "sjxwjo3jfjg2hpnzwwppc5qc24"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canada. Immigration Service"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "b4d0d0a0b1a8b0d6a69f8fc30507e4b48888d58c"
+content = "Card to be presented at Immigration showing that the bearer has passed their medical examination. From the Empress of Britain."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374910"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: c71ac31f-6077-45f1-b4d5-26d36c6ce232
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/c71ac31f-6077-45f1-b4d5-26d36c6ce232.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,62 @@
+title = "Controlled trial of the impact of a BC adult mental health practice support program (AMHPSP) on primary health care professionals' management of depression"
+work_id = "jic7s3flhvaevgwhthz7ug5v6y"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "BioMed Central"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Bianca Lauria-Horner"
+given_name = "Bianca"
+surname = "Lauria-Horner"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Tara Beaulieu"
+given_name = "Tara"
+surname = "Beaulieu"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Stephanie Knaak"
+given_name = "Stephanie"
+surname = "Knaak"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Rivian Weinerman"
+given_name = "Rivian"
+surname = "Weinerman"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 4
+raw_name = "Helen Campbell"
+given_name = "Helen"
+surname = "Campbell"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 5
+raw_name = "Scott Patten"
+given_name = "Scott"
+surname = "Patten"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "aa61e3f0f161316d95a8d473a7e7fece3e9b9962"
+content = "Background:                  Depression affects over 400 million people globally. The majority are seen in primary care. Barriers in providing adequate care are not solely related to physicians' knowledge/skills deficits, but also time constraints, lack of confidence/avoidance, which need to be addressed in mental health-care redesign. We hypothesized that family physician (FP) training in the Adult Mental Health Practice Support Program (AMHPSP) would lead to greater improvements in patient depressive symptom ratings (a priori primary outcome) compared to treatment as usual.                                                  Methods:                  From October 2013 to May 2015, in a controlled trial 77 FP practices were stratified on the total number of physicians/practice as well as urban/rural setting, and randomized to the British Columbia AMHPSP⎯a multi-component contact-based training to enhance FPs' comfort/skills in treating mild-moderate depression (intervention), or no training (control) by an investigator not operationally involved in the trial. FPs with a valid license to practice in NS were eligible. FPs from both groups were asked to identify 3–4 consecutive patients >\u200918\u2009years old, diagnosis of depression, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score ≥ 10, able to read English, intact cognitive functioning. Exclusion criteria: antidepressants within 5\u2009weeks and psychotherapy within 3\u2009months of enrollment, and clinically judged urgent/emergent medical/psychiatric condition. Patients were assigned to the same arm as their physician. Thirty-six practices recruited patients (intervention n =\u200923; control n =\u200913). The study was prematurely terminated at 6\u2009months of enrollment start-date due to concomitant primary health-care transformation by health-system leaders which resulted in increased in-office demands, and recruitment failure. We used the PHQ-9 to assess between-group differences at baseline, 1, 2, 3, and 6\u2009months follow-up. Outcome collectors and assessors were blind to group assignment.       [...]"
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374921"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: f787bb8b-8181-486f-bb32-5683fd59f1a0
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/f787bb8b-8181-486f-bb32-5683fd59f1a0.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "Letter regarding transportation on Canadian Pacific trains to the Canadian Conservative Convention in Ottawa on 5-7 Jul. 1938"
+work_id = "7vzqsijtbjdurn5pntwfzka5ou"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "13f37fd1e8c0e186456f64d5296905271f7b64df"
+content = "General letter to members of the British Columbia Delegation attending the convention."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374902"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 73d03bb7-4125-48b9-80d8-d391e751da7d
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/73d03bb7-4125-48b9-80d8-d391e751da7d.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,48 @@
+title = "A community-based approach to End Land Use planning at Highland Valley Copper"
+work_id = "shikwhsmtnfh5jy3ubw4e5dtfy"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "N. Melaschenko"
+given_name = "N."
+surname = "Melaschenko"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "J. Dickson"
+given_name = "J."
+surname = "Dickson"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "K. Berg"
+given_name = "K."
+surname = "Berg"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "J. Straker"
+given_name = "J."
+surname = "Straker"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "eeae57f3736f0f73d06e4db325a23cbe7b181883"
+content = "The 2016 Highland Valley Copper (HVC) End Land Use Plan was developed as a collaboration between  HVC and Nlaka'pamux communities. The two main goals of the plan were: 1) to incorporate input from  Nlaka'pamux people about landscape reclamation goals, and 2) to identify potential land uses that the postclosure  landscape is capable of providing and that are important to the Nlaka'pamux community.  Nlaka'pamux communities were involved in the planning process through a number of collaborative  workshops. The information shared was incorporated into a technical mapping process to identify possible  post-closure ecosystems. This mapping involved first creating a map from aerial photographs from the  1950s to determine the biogeoclimatic ecosystems that existed prior to mining. Post-closure ecosystem  maps were then created based on Nlaka'pamux input and constrained by the range of potential ecosystems  that can exist on the mine site after closure. Projected post-closure ecosystems were estimated based on (i)  necessary depths and available volumes of reclamation-cover materials, and (ii) altered topography and  changes to the ability of surficial materials to store water due to mining activity. Potential land uses were  then identified.  A plain-language photobook was completed in addition to a technical report to communicate project results  to participating communities."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374930"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: ca30e908-a897-4bd8-8595-51b39d76ca58
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/ca30e908-a897-4bd8-8595-51b39d76ca58.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,41 @@
+title = "An innovative approach to monitoring the physical stability of constructed fish habitat using drones"
+work_id = "evycja2n7bbs5mwvas5zocyfpm"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "J. Ogilvie"
+given_name = "J."
+surname = "Ogilvie"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "H. Topps"
+given_name = "H."
+surname = "Topps"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "L. Nikl"
+given_name = "L."
+surname = "Nikl"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "dc50b29e1b0dd7efb7771852e690fd62e3f9472c"
+content = "In August 2014, a subsurface failure at the Mount Polley mine's tailings storage facility resulted in a debris flow that scoured Hazeltine Creek and a portion of Edney Creek. Creek rehabilitation planning, design and construction commenced immediately following the incident.  A two-phased approach was adopted to reconstruct the creek and restore habitat for fish and riparian wildlife. The first phase was to construct an erosion-resistant engineered channel to control erosion and reduce turbidity in water entering Quesnel Lake. The second phase was to re-establish physical in-stream and riparian habitat along the channel to support a return of biological habitat function.  Following the construction of habitat features in sections of Hazeltine Creek and Edney Creek, drone imagery was used to georeference the locations of the constructed habitat. The aerial imagery had sufficient resolution to geospatially document each element of stream habitat, and therefore monitor its physical stability.  This novel habitat monitoring technique couples the aerial imagery from drones with geographic information system (GIS) software to reliably determine the stability of each element of habitat and develop a database of those habitat elements. This combination of technologies enables an effective, relatively rapid and low-cost means of monitoring constructed fish habitats."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374932"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 5202ae67-3117-49f3-873f-e77a3b344214
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/5202ae67-3117-49f3-873f-e77a3b344214.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,76 @@
+title = "Assessment of the Mount Polley Mine site for potential passive or semi-passive treatment options"
+work_id = "xvxj5x2yefdxtirhcxaaqfqxyu"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Monique Simair"
+given_name = "Monique"
+surname = "Simair"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Rachel Martz"
+given_name = "Rachel"
+surname = "Martz"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Vanessa Friesen"
+given_name = "Vanessa"
+surname = "Friesen"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Katie McMahen"
+given_name = "Katie"
+surname = "McMahen"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 4
+raw_name = "Shauna Litke"
+given_name = "Shauna"
+surname = "Litke"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 5
+raw_name = "Colleen Hughes"
+given_name = "Colleen"
+surname = "Hughes"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 6
+raw_name = "Luke Moger"
+given_name = "Luke"
+surname = "Moger"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 7
+raw_name = "Lyn Anglin"
+given_name = "Lyn"
+surname = "Anglin"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "3c43af8480c17bdd5278272138fc07b6d33200aa"
+content = "Passive water treatment is often sought as a component of long-term mine closure management. Passive water treatment promotes relatively self-sustaining conditions for the management of mine impacted water, with outcomes often being low maintenance and operational costs. However, owing to the sensitive biogeochemical nature of these technologies, a site-specific phased approach is necessary for evaluating passive treatment as a component of mine closure management, and ultimately, its successful implementation. The Mount Polley Mine (the \"Mine\") was evaluated for the viability of constructed wetland treatment systems (CWTSs) as part of their long-term water management plan. A site assessment was conducted, which identified potential plant species for use in a CWTS, and evaluated the water, substrates, and plants in the context of a CWTS. Genetic microbial community profiling was used to assess natural wetlands, and components of the water management infrastructure at the Mine, and was paired with traditional growth-based microbial characterization and quantification. This information was evaluated in the context of water chemistry, treatment objectives, and biogeochemical processes to assess the feasibility for semi-passively or passively treating Mine water. Upon assessment of the natural treatment capacity at the Mine, natural conditions and processes were identified that could potentially benefit water quality."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374937"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: dd11d21f-19b9-4412-8c90-bc3f74b67afd
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/dd11d21f-19b9-4412-8c90-bc3f74b67afd.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,20 @@
+title = "Dinner menu from the Empress of Scotland from 6 May 1928"
+work_id = "cki2jswzwzdwhfayvkmlqeh6zm"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+abstracts = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374908"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: a322a2ce-b144-4dc8-990a-2221f54871ab
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/a322a2ce-b144-4dc8-990a-2221f54871ab.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+title = "Effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid pre-treatment on biofilm dissolution by sodium hypochlorite"
+work_id = "fgb2ii3tevdxthd2ylczk5sdsy"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Joshua Ananthan"
+given_name = "Joshua"
+surname = "Ananthan"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "c9318e82318d82c1cd638dfc80e7cb840fedd579"
+content = "Introduction: Endodontic treatment is aimed at the management and treatment of pathoses   caused by bacterial colonization of the root canal system; this is primarily achieved through mechanical and chemical means. Various irrigants have been introduced in varying degrees, concentrations and combinations to optimize bacterial eradication, however, there is no well established optimal protocol nor a recommended procedure by a regulatory body. The present study aims to evaluate the effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) pre-treatment on sodium hypochlorite's ability to dissolve biofilm.   Materials and Methods: Hydroxyapatite discs were inoculated with subgingival plaque and biofilm was grown in brain-heart infusion broth for three weeks in anaerobic conditions. Samples were exposed to a pre-treatment of either sterile water or 17% EDTA for 30 or 60 seconds, washed with an intermediate sterile water rinse, and subjected to either 2% or 6% sodium hypochlorite. Samples were examined under stereomicroscopy for complete dissolution of the biofilm; time was recorded from initial exposure to sodium hypochlorite to complete dissolution. Results: Biofilm dissolution time was decreased by increasing the concentration of sodium hypochlorite from 2% to 6% for all matched groups. Pre-treatment with 17% EDTA for 30 seconds decreased the time for biofilm dissolution by sodium hypochlorite while pre-treatment with 17% EDTA for 60 seconds increased the time for biofilm dissolution; this effect was conserved between both 2% and 6% concentrations of sodium hypochlorite.   Discussion: Overall, pre-treatment of biofilms with 17% EDTA will alter sodium hypochlorite's dissolution ability. Shorter exposure times may augment NaOCl biofilm dissolution while long exposure times may be detrimental to sodium hypochlorite's dissolution ability. Regardless, of   length of pre-treatment time, sodium hypochlorite at both 2% and 6% concentrations was eventually able to complete dissolve all biofilm in all samples."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374945"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 152b67b5-47a2-4ffe-a397-0922aa4e3382
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/152b67b5-47a2-4ffe-a397-0922aa4e3382.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+title = "Brain network dynamics of auditory change detection and working memory in recreational cannabis users"
+work_id = "mdbqchxy3jgbjeaz3wfbwwirsq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Samuel P. Rumak"
+given_name = "Samuel P."
+surname = "Rumak"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "326d049a40eb2d2302b27bf92063d84cc758606c"
+content = "There are concerns that cannabis use leads to increased risk of mental illness and neurocognitive impairment. However, empirical findings into the deleterious effects of cannabis use on cognition have been mixed and the underlying brain processes are poorly understood. The present research examined auditory cognitive processes putatively related to psychosis and cannabis use. Groups of cannabis users (CU) and non-users (NU) are compared on two novel tasks that examine electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of early somewhat pre-attentional (MMN) and later attentional (P300) auditory change detection and P300 response in auditory working memory. Additionally, sophisticated EEG source localization was used to interrogate underlying oscillatory activity and brain network connectivity. Chapter 2 introduced the novel roving dual oddball task, and revealed an asymmetry between easy and difficult task conditions, possibly due to increased attentional demands as evidenced by an interplay between dorsal and ventral attentional systems. Chapter 3 compared CU and NU on the same dual oddball task and revealed slower response times and increased P300 latency for CU on the more difficult condition. Theta-band network connectivity suggested that CU engaged in a stimulus driven strategy that became less effective in the more difficult condition due to a breakdown of fronto-temporal connectivity. Groups did not differ in early auditory processes (MMN). Chapter 4 unexpectedly revealed CU to have superior performance on working memory for basic auditory features (pitch and pattern), which was partially reflected in larger P300 amplitudes. Theta connectivity revealed different patterns of brain connectivity. Chapter 5 combined data from Chapters 3 and 4 to examine a local MMN effect across a larger sample along with measures putatively related to impairments associated with heavy cannabis use and psychosis. Again, CU did not show reduced MMN and showed only small differences on various measures. As a whole, this research suggests th [...]"
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374944"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: c5ffb825-a2be-443a-8b8a-9fee49670751
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/c5ffb825-a2be-443a-8b8a-9fee49670751.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,83 @@
+title = "A review protocol on research partnerships: a Coordinated Multicenter Team approach"
+work_id = "ii37z5bwu5he7hjwinzyrh6zxu"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "BioMed Central"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Femke Hoekstra"
+given_name = "Femke"
+surname = "Hoekstra"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Kelly J Mrklas"
+given_name = "Kelly J"
+surname = "Mrklas"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Kathryn M Sibley"
+given_name = "Kathryn M"
+surname = "Sibley"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Tram Nguyen"
+given_name = "Tram"
+surname = "Nguyen"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 4
+raw_name = "Mathew Vis-Dunbar"
+given_name = "Mathew"
+surname = "Vis-Dunbar"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 5
+raw_name = "Christine J Neilson"
+given_name = "Christine J"
+surname = "Neilson"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 6
+raw_name = "Leah K. Crockett"
+given_name = "Leah K."
+surname = "Crockett"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 7
+raw_name = "Heather L Gainforth"
+given_name = "Heather L"
+surname = "Gainforth"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 8
+raw_name = "Ian D Graham"
+given_name = "Ian D"
+surname = "Graham"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "38aad766c1ae449ece543ca9c6ceaadb07ea4e0a"
+content = "Background:                  Research partnership approaches, in which researchers and stakeholders work together collaboratively on a research project, are an important component of research, knowledge translation, and implementation. Despite their growing use, a comprehensive understanding of the principles, strategies, outcomes, and impacts of different types of research partnerships is lacking. Generating high-quality evidence in this area is challenging due to the breadth and diversity of relevant literature. We established a Coordinated Multicenter Team approach to identify and synthesize the partnership literature and better understand the evidence base. This review protocol outlines an innovative approach to locating, reviewing, and synthesizing the literature on research partnerships.                                                  Methods:                  Five reviews pertaining to research partnerships are proposed. The Coordinated Multicenter Team developed a consensus-driven conceptual framework to guide the reviews. First, a review of reviews will comparatively describe and synthesize key domains (principles, strategies, outcomes, and impacts) for different research partnership approaches, within and beyond health (e.g., integrated knowledge translation, participatory action research). After identifying commonly used search terminology, three complementary scoping reviews will describe and synthesize these domains in the health research partnership literature. Finally, an umbrella review will amalgamate and reflect on the collective findings and identify research gaps and future directions. We will develop a collaborative review methodology, comprising search strategy efficiencies, terminology standardization, and the division of screening, extraction, and synthesis to optimize feasibility and literature capture. A series of synthesis and scoping manuscripts will emerge from this Coordinated Multicenter Team approach.                                                  Discussion:                  Co [...]"
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+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374942"
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Revision: 0837f5e9-19e1-4c63-a45f-67fdc42fe248
--- (created)
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+title = "Intrinsic heart rate resetting and associated changes in cardiac mRNA expression with thermal acclimation in rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss"
+work_id = "ejregakkmvch7n5adlxrsitfra"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Rachel Louise Sutcliffe"
+given_name = "Rachel Louise"
+surname = "Sutcliffe"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "05907752db834902160dae334b4efe6bad3a5ac8"
+content = "The original aim of my thesis was to follow the timescale of intrinsic heart rate resetting in rainbow trout. Groups of rainbow trout acclimated to either 4°C or 12°C were reciprocally transferred to follow intrinsic heart rate resetting. However, while one group did reset intrinsic heart rate after 1 h at 12°C from 56.8 ± 1.2 to 50.8 ± 1.5 bpm, and after 8 h at 4°C from 33.4 ± 0.7 to 37.7 ± 1.2 bpm; another group did not reset intrinsic heart rate, even after 10 weeks of either warm or cold acclimation. Even though this variation in intrinsic heart rate resetting was unexpected, this serendipitous discovery created an opportunity to better associate changes in mRNA expression specifically with intrinsic heart rate resetting responses, as opposed to more general responses to warm acclimation. Therefore, I used a Fluidigm qRT-PCR system to compare mRNA expression of 28 cardiac function proteins after warm acclimation in three different cardiac tissues (sino-atrial node [SAN], atrium and ventricle) for fish with, and without, an intrinsic heart rate resetting response.   When mRNA expression of three cardiac tissues was compared under control conditions at 4°C, the SAN had a uniquely higher HCN1, Cav1.3 and collagen 1α1 expression, while the ventricle had a uniquely higher RYR3 and NKA α3 expression. After > 3 weeks of warm acclimation, downregulation of NKA α1c in the atrium and ventricle, and upregulation of HCN1 in the ventricle were discovered in fish with an intrinsic heart rate resetting response, whereas upregulation of HCN3 in the SAN and atrium was discovered in fish without an intrinsic heart rate resetting response. However, no mRNA expression changes were observed after just 1 h of warm acclimation.   In conclusion, while initial intrinsic heart rate resetting does not involve changes in mRNA expression, changes in mRNA expression are apparent over the longer term and may be associated with the different intrinsic heart rate resetting responses. Moreover, my results suggest that while intrinsic heart [...]"
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+doi = "10.14288/1.0374915"
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Revision: 549f9004-bd9c-49d9-aabd-e658de9e4f08
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+title = "Effecting change by using innovative techniques in low risk projects"
+work_id = "v2jfphtozzbynk5ekyy6tlhohe"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "David Sahlstrom"
+given_name = "David"
+surname = "Sahlstrom"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "8cad106572dbfad2439c61723b773c80f9a1f28d"
+content = "The ability to maximize the environmental value of reclamation is often constrained by engineering design criteria and protocol as well as specified standards. While standards minimize the chance of project failures, there are situations where strict adherence has stifled innovation. Evaluating the risks associated with projects can identify lower risk opportunities where innovative techniques can be explored. This paper presents a conceptual framework for evaluating risk and applies it to two scenarios; evaluating stream stabilization projects using rip rap and reclamation of acidic tailings. Cases studies are presented where low risk projects have used innovative techniques that have the potential to shift the paradigm with respect to commonly applied approaches in mine reclamation to improve the environmental values of reclamation."
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+doi = "10.14288/1.0374936"
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Revision: 9289c12b-d9b0-459e-bde5-1e588a86a693
--- (created)
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+title = "Identifying technical debt through issue trackers"
+work_id = "qrjd4ep7ozcg7ceubbpd7bpp7a"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Ke Dai"
+given_name = "Ke"
+surname = "Dai"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "ce38c6bc783cd165f7f86d0575d2818447bed21e"
+content = "Technical debt is a figurative expression to describe a phenomenon where software development organizations compromise some quality attributes of their products (e.g., maintainability and evolvability) in order to achieve some business benefits in the software development lifecycle. Technical debt may also be incurred unintentionally due to inconsiderate design decisions, poor programming practices or technological gaps.    Different from bugs or defects, technical debt is mostly invisible to customers or end users as the software often works well from their perspective and even developers are often unconscious of the existence of technical debt. The invisibility of technical debt increases the risk of high maintenance and evolution cost in the future. Thus, it is crucial to manage technical debt effectively to assure the health of the software system.    The first step of managing technical debt is the identification of technical debt. Many source code analysis tools have been developed to identify code-level technical debt; however, identifying non-code-level technical debt remains understudied and needs deep exploration. This thesis proposes an approach to identifying non-code-level technical debt through issue trackers using natural language processing and machine learning techniques and evaluates the performance of our approach using two issue-tracking data sets in English and Chinese respectively from open source and commercial software projects. We found that there are actually some common English and Chinese words that can be used as indicators of technical debt. We analyzed how these words contribute to indicating technical debt and compared the similarities between English and Chinese key phrases at the semantic level. Based on these key phrases, we developed different classifiers to detect technical debt issues automatically using machine learning techniques, evaluated and compared the performance of these classifiers in identifying technical debt issues recorded in English and Chinese respectively."
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Revision: 0c8d6850-2aad-4473-bd73-1f937e2e2243
--- (created)
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+title = "Teck's recent experience in pursuing Net Positive Impact (NPI) for biodiversity at coal mines in BC and Alberta"
+work_id = "pjehul53lzewvctiruulgufuhq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "C. W. Franklin"
+given_name = "C. W."
+surname = "Franklin"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "S. R. Hilts"
+given_name = "S. R."
+surname = "Hilts"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "R. E. Gullison"
+given_name = "R. E."
+surname = "Gullison"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "a62333bf995b33378c01a3adf960c2cdb93fea2a"
+content = "In 2011, Teck Coal Limited (Teck) adopted an aspirational, long-term (2030) goal to achieve a Net Positive Impact (NPI) on biodiversity. This paper provides an overview of conceptual and technical advances as they relate to our NPI strategy and targets. Key learnings include: (i) The scope of our biodiversity commitment has proven possible to operationalize and has been generally supported by our communities of interest and First Nations (ii) Through the use of historical aerial photos and data, digital imagery, and predictive ecosystem mapping, we have developed credible pre-development baselines of ecosystems and wildlife habitat suitability for our operations, even though some are many decades old (iii) In order to support a quantitative accounting of our gains and losses to ecosystems, we have developed a measurement framework for assessing the condition or quality of ecosystems based on the BC provincial Biogeoclimatic Ecosystem Classification (BEC) and database of benchmark data. We still face some challenges, including the lack of a landscape conservation plan for the Elk Valley region and knowledge of specific reclamation techniques that will allow us to restore the full range of ecosystems that existed at our operations prior to disturbance."
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+doi = "10.14288/1.0374924"
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Revision: 1597835e-048c-44db-abc0-7d6326df47bb
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+++ /release/rev/1597835e-048c-44db-abc0-7d6326df47bb.toml
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+title = "Design of landform elements for mine reclamation"
+work_id = "dutivm4pkrhfraeoflozewbcdy"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "J. A. Pollard"
+given_name = "J. A."
+surname = "Pollard"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Gord McKenna"
+given_name = "Gord"
+surname = "McKenna"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "c84bc411b29bdc4186db0d6f1f044c3fc04f3876"
+content = "Landform design is the multidisciplinary process that builds mining landforms, landscapes, and regions to  meet agreed upon land use goals and objectives. Such work starts even before mining begins, carries on  through mine development and operation, and continues through closure and beyond to guide post-mining  stewardship of the land. It allows mining companies, regulators, and local communities to progressively  reclaim the land with confidence, managing costs, risks, and liabilities, to create beneficial landscapes.  Landform elements are specific physical subcomponents of a mining landform that are designed to allow  the landform to meet the overall landform-scale design goals and objectives. They are typically large  enough to be featured on a detailed design drawing and be built with normal mine reclamation equipment;  they are usually in the 10 to 100m scale. Some elements are exquisitely designed while some are simply  field-fit. Examples of landform elements include swales, mounds, outlets, watershed berms, vegetation  patches, meandering toe creeks, islands, and wildlife enhancements such as snags and rockpiles. All provide  efficient and practical solutions to complex mine reclamation problems. The paper provides a list of 97  landform elements for mine reclamation for common mining landforms including waste dumps, tailings  facilities, and end pit lakes."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374933"
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Revision: 20865591-06d9-490d-84a3-dab82a3e7a15
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/20865591-06d9-490d-84a3-dab82a3e7a15.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "13 ports, 28 days West Indies cruise from $270"
+work_id = "wdunjxni3bhxbhhpsskg6x3krm"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "Canada : Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "599d54bb029042e31e18f29e7df3d105cb1b3c1b"
+content = "Pamphlet advertising a cruise of the West Indies on the Duchess of Bedford."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374909"
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Revision: 6a9bbd02-57e0-4117-9f4b-5fb0d1c9e9e7
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/6a9bbd02-57e0-4117-9f4b-5fb0d1c9e9e7.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+title = "Ultrathin conducting polymer transducers : fabrication, characterization, and modeling"
+work_id = "k5ttcrxx25ce3l2in3duiqfdcq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Ngoc Tan Nguyen"
+given_name = "Ngoc Tan"
+surname = "Nguyen"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "0677b8fd3f54e93ba7fac7b1fe6920224ee2e44e"
+content = "Recently, ultrathin poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) – based ionic actuators have overcome some initial obstacles to increase the potential for applications in microfabricated devices. While microfabrication processing of trilayer actuators that involve no manual handling has been demonstrated, their mechanical performances remain limited for practical applications.   The goal of this thesis is to optimize the transducers in thin films fabrication by micro technologies, fully characterize the electrochemomechanical properties of the resulting trilayers, and develop a model to simulate their bidirectional electromechanical ability (actuation and sensing).   At first, ultrathin PEDOT-based trilayer actuators are fabricated via the vapor phase polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene combining with the layer by layer synthesis process. This constitutes the first full characterization of ionic PEDOT-based microactuators operating in air of such a small thickness (17 µm) having bending deformation and output force generation of 1% and 12 µN respectively.   Secondly, electrical, electrochemical and mechanical properties of the resulting microactuators have been thoroughly studied. Non-linear characterization was extended to volumetric capacitance dependence on voltage window. Damping coefficient was characterized for the first time.   Thirdly, a nonlinear multi-physics model was proposed as a method of simulating actuator and sensor responses in trilayers, represented using a Bond Graph formalism, and was able to implement all of the characterized parameters. The concordance between the simulations and the measurements confirmed the accuracy of the model in predicting the non-linear dynamic behavior of the actuators. In addition, the information extracted from the model also provided an insight into the critical parameters of the actuators and how they affect the actuator efficiency, as well as the energy distribution.  Finally, a nouveau bidirectional electromechanical linear model was introduced to simul [...]"
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+doi = "10.14288/1.0374916"
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+[extra.datacite]
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Revision: 10304c82-09f7-489a-8558-a4486b1d5710
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/10304c82-09f7-489a-8558-a4486b1d5710.toml
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+title = "Passenger list"
+work_id = "zml5cf5iz5fohigz3uii25aw5m"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "fr"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "37fcdc480fd90c1487647308d9b03eb0085f623e"
+content = "Passenger list for the Duchess of York's 15 Aug. 1931 sailing from Southampton to Montreal."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374905"
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Revision: 681d654d-60b8-425a-8d31-8c5581521533
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/681d654d-60b8-425a-8d31-8c5581521533.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,34 @@
+title = "End Land Use objective planning : integrating an ecosystem based approach into biodiversity and reclamation planning"
+work_id = "ub72txsavzegbbrjmi35uew3u4"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "C. W. Franklin"
+given_name = "C. W."
+surname = "Franklin"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "A. Burton"
+given_name = "A."
+surname = "Burton"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "06dc1591112ec3931beb2b5953d6d682ab4e3223"
+content = "Mining operations in British Columbia are governed by regulation to plan towards End Land Use (ELU) objectives. Historically, ELU objectives at Teck Coal Limited's (Teck) operations in southeastern British Columbia have been focused on single or closely related uses represented over broad temporal periods, such as \"wildlife habitat\". Teck has been moving towards the aspirational vision of achieving a Net Positive Impact (NPI) in areas where Teck operates, in as much Teck is collaboratively working with the Ktunaxa Nation Council (KNC) in redefining what the ELU objectives could be. This collaboration strategically facilitates dialogue that has occurred between KNC and Teck over many years, and aligns with guidance from Ktunaxa citizens, who are deeply connected with a vision of what the landscape would look like post-mining. The main intent was to define a holistic approach that includes elements of NPI as well as cultural knowledge and use from the Ktunaxa Nation's perspective. Working in an open and collaborative process, Teck and KNC have developed an approach to ELU objective planning based on an ecosystem approach which defines multiple end land uses on the same areas that evolve and change over time as the successional status of the ecosystems mature. This approach has enabled Teck to present ELU objective plans that move away from managing for single, or relatively few, end land use targets that remain static over time. In addition, the approach models ecosystem successional development and identifies temporal distributions where ELU objectives adapt and change over time in relation to the evolving ecosystem conditions. The ELU objective planning is the foundation for reclamation planning and revegetation treatments and is aligned with the vision of NPI and the Ktunaxa Nation's view of reclamation planning to achieve ecological function and natural change over time."
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+doi = "10.14288/1.0374923"
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Revision: d3490611-9c1a-4b1c-95b3-f515b37c6636
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/d3490611-9c1a-4b1c-95b3-f515b37c6636.toml
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+title = "Cave-to-mill : mine and mill integration for block cave mines"
+work_id = "gm2ycjq7dvggdcnzvtvrpjuyge"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Stefan Nadolski"
+given_name = "Stefan"
+surname = "Nadolski"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "36e0940afc84acb01db3b89003319cee5531c9b3"
+content = "Population growth and economic development are expected to increase future global copper demand. The depletion of significant near-surface deposits and advances in detecting deeply buried ore has led to the mining industry progressively exploring further below the surface to discover new copper deposits. Accordingly, block and panel cave mining methods are being increasingly proposed as they allow massive, deeply situated ore-bodies to be mined economically. To improve the productivity of a mining method that will be used to excavate a growing proportion of global copper supply, an integrated mine and mill approach for planning and operating block cave mines, termed Cave-to-Mill, was developed.      Key distinguishing features of cave mining, in comparison to other mining methods, are the uncertainty in the size of rock being fed to the mill and the lack of selectivity. As part of the Cave-to-Mill framework, fragmentation and sensor-based sorting studies were carried out at the New Afton block cave mine to investigate opportunities to improve overall productivity.    Cave fragmentation is a key cave-to-mill parameter as it has implications on the productivity of both mining and milling processes. Fragmentation measurements of drawpoint muck, comminution tests and calibrated mill models were used to assess the impact of variations in feed size and hardness on New Afton mill performance. Analysis of historical mine and mill data showed that mill feed size and subsequently mill throughput are sensitive to the areas being mucked within the cave.     A sensor-based ore sorting study, incorporating bulk and particle sorting systems, showed that rock from the New Afton copper-gold porphyry deposit is amenable to prompt gamma neutron activation analysis, and to X-Ray fluorescence sensors. A conceptual flowsheet, where both technologies are used as separate unit operations, was evaluated. It was found that the sorting concept demonstrated an improvement in the net smelter return of excavated material. Results from the stu [...]"
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+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374946"
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Revision: 30027f34-839f-4062-8f4a-8ce86e5338fe
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/30027f34-839f-4062-8f4a-8ce86e5338fe.toml
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+title = "Investigations of metal mobility and bioavailability in spill-affected lakes"
+work_id = "xvnypna26jhejc3apw2ftzay24"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Pierre Stecko"
+given_name = "Pierre"
+surname = "Stecko"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Katharina Batchelar"
+given_name = "Katharina"
+surname = "Batchelar"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Colleen Hughes"
+given_name = "Colleen"
+surname = "Hughes"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Lyn Anglin"
+given_name = "Lyn"
+surname = "Anglin"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "4d7355f6984593725ee86ac0d5b29de08859d7e1"
+content = "A foundational failure of the perimeter embankment of the Mount Polley Tailings Storage Facility (TSF) on August 4th 2014 resulted in a breach that released approximately 25 million cubic meters of debris (water and solids that consisted of tailings, construction materials, and scoured sediment and soil). The debris flowed into Polley Lake, along the length of Hazeltine Creek, and into Quesnel Lake. Sediment quality investigations indicated that sediments within the debris path contained concentrations of copper that were consistently greater than baseline and/or reference concentrations and British Columbia's upper working sediment quality guideline, concentrations of arsenic and iron that were greater than baseline and/or reference concentrations and British Columbia's lower working sediment quality guidelines, and concentrations of manganese that were greater than reference concentrations (in affected areas of Quesnel Lake but not Polley Lake) and British Columbia's lower working sediment quality guideline. All of the elevated metals have been previously observed at concentrations greater than working sediment quality guidelines at un-impacted areas of the Polley Lake and Quesnel Lake watersheds. A number of lines of investigation were carried out to characterize the mobility and potential bioavailability of metals within debris-impacted lake sediments, including selective chemical extractions, characterization of metal binding constituents (e.g., organic matter and volatile sulphides), application of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) devices, sediment toxicity testing, and benthic invertebrate community monitoring. Selective chemical extractions indicated that concentrations of the metals most elevated in the debris path were predominantly present in non-mobile forms and that concentrations in forms that are considered to be potentially mobile and/or bioavailable (exchangeable, carbonate, and easily reducible forms) were generally below lower working sediment quality guidelines. For copper, this finding [...]"
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+doi = "10.14288/1.0374938"
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Revision: 7e113155-9b7f-4135-9047-cfb686115cfc
--- (created)
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+title = "Finding all DC operating points using interval-arithmetic-based verification algorithms"
+work_id = "cc26pkvovnekdfzd3qcedb36me"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Itrat Ahmed Akhter"
+given_name = "Itrat Ahmed"
+surname = "Akhter"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "10067a8df812c8bba343372914e8e6d1888b6a55"
+content = "Finding operating points of circuits is a crucial first step for simulation and verification.  Traditional operating point analyses such as homotopy analysis do find an  operating point. However, a circuit may have many DC equilibria, and failing to  consider an unintended initial condition can lead to failures escaping to the physical  silicon. This work presents a method for finding all DC equilibrium points;  this approach is based on interval-arithmetic-based verification algorithms; and our  open-source implementation supports state-of-the-art short-channel device models.  This work also presents what we believe to be the first, completely automatic verification  of the Rambus ring-oscillator start-up problem. Our method offers large  performance and scalability advantages when compared with the dReal and Z3  SMT solvers."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374943"
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+[extra.datacite]
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Revision: c924f2a5-232d-4319-b0fb-87df192d2733
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/c924f2a5-232d-4319-b0fb-87df192d2733.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,20 @@
+title = "Receipt for amount paid for wagon service from Canadian Pacific Railway to the Empress of Scotland"
+work_id = "xoy32fp5tzdyhlbok6bijglkgq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+abstracts = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374906"
+
+[extra.datacite]
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Revision: 0cd5dd58-d687-4fc6-abfa-5422afa6c534
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/0cd5dd58-d687-4fc6-abfa-5422afa6c534.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "Canadian Pacific : \"Empress of Scotland\""
+work_id = "b2eqgp6uczhkjjmwcw2hq7xwnm"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "London : Eyre & Spottiswoode, Ltd"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "57e9f57bd265c3139a36fc94a7a6452e5165f991"
+content = "Pamphlet advertising the Empress of Scotland."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374903"
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+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
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Revision: 69d0a214-1fd9-4e46-9aa0-f4755aca3101
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/69d0a214-1fd9-4e46-9aa0-f4755aca3101.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,34 @@
+title = "Selenium concentration and loading in the vicinity of Bullmoose mine during post-closure phase"
+work_id = "wzs5vrwapjhovpcz5u4lhuxlr4"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Wenying Liu"
+given_name = "Wenying"
+surname = "Liu"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Susan A. Baldwin"
+given_name = "Susan A."
+surname = "Baldwin"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "f38f3a4014b68842fc575743133c35e048278528"
+content = "Selenium release from mine waste materials triggers significant environmental and social problems. This article reports results of a case study of concentrations and loads of selenium in the vicinity of the closed Bullmoose coal mine located in northeastern British Columbia. To illustrate what has been happening in the post-closure phase, we analyzed historical data on total selenium concentrations at the discharge point (SP-2) and in the receiving stream over an eight-year period after the mine was closed. It was found that selenium concentrations in the receiving Bullmoose Creek exceeded the current water quality guideline of 2 μg/L. The highest selenium loads were discharged at SP-2 in June (65%). A linear regression analysis showed a slight downward trend in June selenium loads discharged. Correspondingly, the stream received the highest proportion of selenium in June, and June stream selenium loads also showed a slight downward trend. Dilution was thought to be the major factor in dictating stream selenium concentration in the high-flow period. Even though the stream received minimal loads of selenium in September, consistent monitoring on stream selenium concentrations in this low-flow period was important due to low dilution and possible selenium desorption via hyporheic exchange."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374927"
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Revision: b508b618-bf82-459f-9d51-4650aaba9f2d
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/b508b618-bf82-459f-9d51-4650aaba9f2d.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,90 @@
+title = "Revisiting patient satisfaction following total knee arthroplasty: a longitudinal observational study"
+work_id = "ozk4j3qkxfeqtk2uxlxbid7z4u"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "BioMed Central"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Stirling Bryan"
+given_name = "Stirling"
+surname = "Bryan"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Laurie J Goldsmith"
+given_name = "Laurie J"
+surname = "Goldsmith"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Jennifer C Davis"
+given_name = "Jennifer C"
+surname = "Davis"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Samar Hejazi"
+given_name = "Samar"
+surname = "Hejazi"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 4
+raw_name = "Valerie MacDonald"
+given_name = "Valerie"
+surname = "MacDonald"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 5
+raw_name = "Patrick McAllister"
+given_name = "Patrick"
+surname = "McAllister"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 6
+raw_name = "Ellen Randall"
+given_name = "Ellen"
+surname = "Randall"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 7
+raw_name = "Nitya Suryaprakash"
+given_name = "Nitya"
+surname = "Suryaprakash"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 8
+raw_name = "Amery D Wu"
+given_name = "Amery D"
+surname = "Wu"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 9
+raw_name = "Richard Sawatzky"
+given_name = "Richard"
+surname = "Sawatzky"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "4e964c32f6c4e86030471954c27c02ab48812e67"
+content = "Background:                  Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common joint replacement surgery in Canada. Earlier Canadian work reported 1 in 5 TKA patients expressing dissatisfaction following surgery. A better understanding of satisfaction could guide program improvement. We investigated patient satisfaction post-TKA in British Columbia (BC).                                                  Methods:                  A cohort of 515 adult TKA patients was recruited from across BC. Survey data were collected preoperatively and at 6 and 12\u2009months, supplemented by administrative health data. The primary outcome measure was patient satisfaction with outcomes. Potential satisfaction drivers included demographics, patient-reported health, quality of life, social support, comorbidities, and insurance status. Multivariable growth modeling was used to predict satisfaction at 6\u2009months and change in satisfaction (6 to 12\u2009months).                                                  Results:                  We found dissatisfaction rates (\"very dissatisfied\", \"dissatisfied\" or \"neutral\") of 15% (6\u2009months) and 16% (12\u2009months). Across all health measures, improvements were seen post-surgery. The multivariable model suggests satisfaction at 6\u2009months is predicted by: pre-operative pain, mental health and physical health (odds ratios (ORs) 2.65, 3.25 and 3.16), and change in pain level, baseline to 6\u2009months (OR 2.31). Also, improvements in pain, mental health and physical health from 6 to 12\u2009months predicted improvements in satisfaction (ORs 1.24, 1.30 and 1.55).                                                  Conclusions:                  TKA is an effective intervention for many patients and most report high levels of satisfaction. However, if the TKA does not deliver improvements in pain and physical health, we see a less satisfied patient. In addition, dissatisfied TKA patients typically see limited improvements in mental health."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374941"
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Revision: 9d117ac4-22c3-4d38-ad31-0777c40d2a15
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/9d117ac4-22c3-4d38-ad31-0777c40d2a15.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "Menu, ticket and  information sheet from excursions on a Mediterranean cruise"
+work_id = "xxpvdhfyhvgwnemoi3qpo72kmq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "cb4549fe5883e4d3a7c460c24867799d2d158f2f"
+content = "Menu for a special meal at the Hotel M. Tokatlain in Constantinople, ticket from the Naples and Pompeii excursion, and an information sheet about the excursion to Alexandria and Cairo."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374900"
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+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
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Revision: c45bd85b-ab64-4f17-9b24-04803237bc13
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/c45bd85b-ab64-4f17-9b24-04803237bc13.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,48 @@
+title = "Using ecosystem water and carbon fluxes as integrated measures of reclamation success"
+work_id = "wxjfrhak6nbevgxe42vj3qcfkq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "J. Straker"
+given_name = "J."
+surname = "Straker"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "T. Baker"
+given_name = "T."
+surname = "Baker"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "S. Carey"
+given_name = "S."
+surname = "Carey"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "R. Petrone"
+given_name = "R."
+surname = "Petrone"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "dc8e82d0d11048f4393ff87930addf6d53317ef4"
+content = "The cycling of water, energy, and carbon are ecosystem functions that support the overall health and success of vegetated ecosystems. With insufficient water and/or nutrients, water use and carbon uptake are reduced and ecosystems experience stress. In most of western and northern Canada, ecosystems experience growing-season water stresses that limit growth. Understanding the linkages between climate, water availability and use, and carbon assimilation is central to understanding of the magnitude of this limitation, and of key ecosystem functions.  We assembled and synthesized over 15 years of research on water and carbon fluxes and ecosystem development on reclaimed oil-sands mine sites and on non-mine reference sites in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region of northern Alberta. A central premise of this work is that if reclaimed and reference sites with similar moisture and nutrient availability are using water and assimilating carbon at similar rates under the same climate, this suggests that the reclaimed sites are experiencing no greater levels of environmental stress than the reference sites, and no greater limitations to utilizing available site resources. Results of our work indicate similar functional processes of water storage and use, and carbon assimilation, between mine sites reclaimed to boreal-forest communities and non-mine reference sites."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374939"
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+[extra.datacite]
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Revision: c8a46916-6af2-4f76-84f4-8f7e36c9b1b9
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/c8a46916-6af2-4f76-84f4-8f7e36c9b1b9.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "Passenger list, first class : Empress of Scotland"
+work_id = "54w4tyqwjfa2zolydm32qtucse"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "a36c19cf410c24119d50c4741bf42b14c9f6a02b"
+content = "Passenger list for the Empress of Scotland's 27 Aug. 1927 sailing from Southampton to Quebec."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374911"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 0c53c665-6d09-433e-9515-96aa2a75dc7a
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/0c53c665-6d09-433e-9515-96aa2a75dc7a.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,48 @@
+title = "Bralorne-Takla mercury mine : innovative risk management and reclamation"
+work_id = "h44nxl7n2zf5jhn45v2sjqpakq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Joanna Runnells"
+given_name = "Joanna"
+surname = "Runnells"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Trevor McConkey"
+given_name = "Trevor"
+surname = "McConkey"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Tony Gillett"
+given_name = "Tony"
+surname = "Gillett"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Beth Power"
+given_name = "Beth"
+surname = "Power"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "7e8ec8cf14d3ad8656d2f62b7bb7b36f19ba1e84"
+content = "The historic Bralorne-Takla mercury mine is located north of Fort St. James, B.C. within the traditional territory of the Takla Lake First Nation (TLFN). The wastes, equipment, and other materials remained until B.C.'s Crown Contaminated Sites Program (CCSP) began investigations in 2005. Working in partnership with TLFN, remediation and reclamation was completed in 2017.  Investigation confirmed the presence of unacceptable risks to human health and ecological receptors. The CCSP and the TLFN collaboratively identified remedial objectives including protecting of human health and the environment and returning the mine site to forest ecosystem.  The remedial approach included capping mine openings, demolition of structures, off-site disposal of Hazardous Waste; consolidation of non-Hazardous Waste into two on-site landfills; revegetation; and implementation of administrative risk controls to protect future site users. The cover design included innovative elements to support forest growth. Selection of native species for seed mix, shrub and trees replanting focused on returning the mine site to a forest ecosystem and supporting traditional use of the land.  Monitoring of covers, drainage systems, landfill gases, water quality, vegetation performance, and administrative (land use) risk controls is ongoing. Additional monitoring includes ambient mercury vapour monitoring and biomonitoring."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374935"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
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Revision: 982351a0-5a4e-4fd7-b98e-5b797f6e90c0
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/982351a0-5a4e-4fd7-b98e-5b797f6e90c0.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,69 @@
+title = "Assessing community (peer) researcher's experiences with conducting spirometry and being engaged in the 'Participatory Research in Ottawa: Management and Point-of-care for Tobacco-dependence' (PROMPT) project"
+work_id = "6fs6qrww3zfm7c2axjkzdeduoq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "BioMed Central"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Catherine B Charron"
+given_name = "Catherine B"
+surname = "Charron"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Alzahra Hudani"
+given_name = "Alzahra"
+surname = "Hudani"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Tina Kaur"
+given_name = "Tina"
+surname = "Kaur"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Tiffany Rose"
+given_name = "Tiffany"
+surname = "Rose"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 4
+raw_name = "Kelly Florence"
+given_name = "Kelly"
+surname = "Florence"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 5
+raw_name = "Sadia Jama"
+given_name = "Sadia"
+surname = "Jama"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 6
+raw_name = "Smita Pakhalé"
+given_name = "Smita"
+surname = "Pakhalé"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "ad172458b14aaf827a383fad6f6cd2aaee4bc740"
+content = "Plain summary: This article examines the overall experiences of community researchers in their involvement with the 'PROMPT' project for smoking cessation, which targeted community members who were homeless or at-risk for homelessness. More specifically, four community members, representing the study population were involved in the project as researchers. They were asked to complete surveys at both the beginning and end of each research training session to better understand their learning as it related to using a key instrument for this project, a spirometer, to measure project participants' lung function. Spirometry is typically performed by trained healthcare providers. Community researchers were also interviewed to explore what their experiences were like working as a researcher with their own at-risk community. Although the researchers felt that the training was sufficient, more research is needed to evaluate training effectiveness among community researchers in delivering acceptable quality lung function testing using a spirometer. Upon analyzing the small group discussion and survey results, we found that the community researchers had an overall positive experience with both the project, and the training that was provided to equip them with the knowledge, tools, and resources they needed to successfully work in a research project of this kind. They also faced challenges that are common in such community-based projects, such as the power differential between the researchers with a healthcare background and themselves who have lived experience with the issue at hand.                                      Background:                                    The Ottawa Citizen Engagement and Action Model (OCEAM) used a Community Based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR) approach by involving the most at-risk urban population. Community (peer) researchers participated in every step of the study despite the multiple challenges.                                      Objective:                                    To asses [...]"
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374947"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
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Revision: 8075e2fa-17c5-40a9-8d7d-5222dda46900
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/8075e2fa-17c5-40a9-8d7d-5222dda46900.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,41 @@
+title = "Line Creek large woody debris enhancement project : applying long-term monitoring and research to habitat rehabilitation design"
+work_id = "5tzczfkunzcmbpnzu6rjv2wvou"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "M. D. Robinson"
+given_name = "M. D."
+surname = "Robinson"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "J. Bransfield"
+given_name = "J."
+surname = "Bransfield"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "M. Gaboury"
+given_name = "M."
+surname = "Gaboury"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "e12677c2a67b8aa18f3a88c107ef03f3e09ce59d"
+content = "Line Creek is an important spawning tributary for Bull Trout (BT; Salvelinus confluentus) inhabiting the  Elk River upstream of a migratory barrier at Elko BC. Ongoing fisheries monitoring has shown BT  spawning to be associated with the glide (i.e. pool/tail-out) habitat typically created by large woody debris  (LWD) jams. In June 2013, a large flood mobilized and removed much of the functional instream LWD  from Line Creek. Results from annual monitoring confirmed the loss of LWD and associated pool habitat,  as well as the lowest BT spawning counts on record. In 2014, we completed a multi-scale characterization  of BT spawning locations in Line Creek to document habitat characteristics at watershed, reach, and  channel unit scales. This study successfully described preferred spawning use in certain areas of the  watershed, reaches of the creek, and specific habitat units. Hydraulic conditions were also described at  observed spawning sites within individual habitat units. At the habitat unit scale, we were able to develop a  Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) based on water depth, water velocity, and vertical hydraulic gradient. This  information was applied to rehabilitation designs at a variety of scales. At the watershed scale, this study  has guided work into portions of the watershed suitable to BT spawning (corroborated by previous  assessments) and guided work along reaches that lack the preferred habitat attributes required to support  spawning. At the habitat unit or rehabilitation structure scale, these results coupled with habitat  assessments are informing the designs of LWD structures that mimic the natural jams displaced in June  2013. Rehabilitation work in Reach 1 of Line Creek was completed in summer 2017."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374934"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
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Revision: fab412af-f079-4723-bdaa-c3d7494d9f9d
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/fab412af-f079-4723-bdaa-c3d7494d9f9d.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,41 @@
+title = "Conifer seedling establishment on a rock disposal site at the Mount Polley Mine to assess competitive effects of various herbaceous groundcovers when using biosolids as a soil amendment"
+work_id = "q3isdjv6yreojeftbemdpertle"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Janelle Hunt"
+given_name = "Janelle"
+surname = "Hunt"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Gabriel Holmes"
+given_name = "Gabriel"
+surname = "Holmes"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Katie McMahen"
+given_name = "Katie"
+surname = "McMahen"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "e18cf631f73bcdd20cc87a9fccd489cc51e41861"
+content = "A field-scale tree trial was established in 2013 and 2014 on rock disposal site slopes at Mount Polley Mine to evaluate herbaceous groundcovers' ability to promote coniferous tree growth on parcels amended with biosolids. Parcels were amended with 20 cm of overburden and biosolids were applied at a rate of 110 dry tonnes per hectare (control parcels received no biosolids). The parcels were then seeded with either: native grasses and forbs (at 5 kg/ha or 10 kg/ha), native forbs, fireweed, or unseeded. The control parcels were also unseeded. Lodgepole pine, Douglas-fir, and deciduous tree and shrub seedlings were planted across all parcels.  After two and three growing seasons, herbaceous vegetative cover was highest on parcels seeded with native grasses and lowest on the forbs, fireweed, and unseeded parcels. Higher cover was associated with greater competition with conifer seedlings, increased vegetation/snow press, increased herbivory and reduced seedling survival. Growth of the conifers however, was higher on the parcels amended with biosolids compared to control parcels. These results suggest that the understory on biosolids amended soils should be seeded at low seeding rates with native forbs in order to have the highest conifer survival while still providing erosion and invasive plant control."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374925"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
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Revision: e1b10fbf-f279-4354-9957-d9fc9940f604
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/e1b10fbf-f279-4354-9957-d9fc9940f604.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,62 @@
+title = "Who is in the near market for bicycle sharing? Identifying current, potential, and unlikely users of a public bicycle share program in Vancouver, Canada"
+work_id = "npddikyzxffnhbzbu5utbeogzy"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "BioMed Central"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Kate Hosford"
+given_name = "Kate"
+surname = "Hosford"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Scott A Lear"
+given_name = "Scott A"
+surname = "Lear"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Daniel Fuller"
+given_name = "Daniel"
+surname = "Fuller"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Kay Teschke"
+given_name = "Kay"
+surname = "Teschke"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 4
+raw_name = "Suzanne Therrien"
+given_name = "Suzanne"
+surname = "Therrien"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 5
+raw_name = "Meghan Winters"
+given_name = "Meghan"
+surname = "Winters"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "5c52ea9ebe6a438357ba69047e1e0e7318bc40d8"
+content = "Background:                  Public bicycle share programs in many cities are used by a small segment of the population. To better understand the market for public bicycle share, this study examined the socio-demographic and transportation characteristics of current, potential, and unlikely users of a public bicycle share program and identified specific motivators and deterrents to public bicycle share use.                                                  Methods:                  We used cross-sectional data from a 2017 Vancouver public bicycle share (Mobi by Shaw Go) member survey (n\u2009=\u20091272) and a 2017 population-based survey of Vancouver residents (n\u2009=\u2009792). We categorized non-users from the population survey as either potential or unlikely users based on their stated interest in using public bicycle share within the next year. We used descriptive statistics to compare the demographic and transportation characteristics of current users to non-users, and multiple logistic regression to compare the profiles of potential and unlikely users.                                                  Results:                  Public bicycle share users in Vancouver tended to be male, employed, and have higher educations and incomes as compared to non-users, and were more likely to use active modes of transportation. The vast majority of non-users (74%) thought the public bicycle share program was a good idea for Vancouver. Of the non-users, 23% were identified as potential users. Potential users tended to be younger, have lower incomes, and were more likely to use public transit for their main mode of transportation, as compared to current and unlikely users. The most common motivators among potential users related to health benefits, not owning a bicycle, and stations near their home or destination. The deterrents among unlikely users were a preference for riding their own bicycle, perceived inconvenience compared to other modes, bad weather, and traffic. Cost was a deterrent to one-fifth of unlikely users, notable given th [...]"
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+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374922"
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Revision: e7dadc12-59c5-4206-a19b-7c4ef1b32fb2
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/e7dadc12-59c5-4206-a19b-7c4ef1b32fb2.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "Menu from the Empress of Scotland from 12 Feb. 1922"
+work_id = "rn5c2ljs6zbu7pnkxuu654y3we"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Steamships"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "53e9977af63ebbaa67b7446a95f2ce4f1fbf1c75"
+content = "From Clark's cruise to the Mediterranean & Europe. Dinner in honour of Lincoln's birthday."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374907"
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Revision: ac9ef54e-5d48-47b8-8b0c-6ceafaefc0db
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/ac9ef54e-5d48-47b8-8b0c-6ceafaefc0db.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+title = "A multi-omic perspective on microbial mediated methane oxidation in the Saanich Inlet water column"
+work_id = "uxtcy5jrgbexfoeo5p45pmxfda"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Torres Beltrán Mónica"
+given_name = "Torres Beltrán"
+surname = "Mónica"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "a64bc6bd46c5287dd6fefd143a8246cb026a6c8d"
+content = "Microbial communities play an integral role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur throughout the biosphere. These communities interact, forming metabolic networks that change and adapt in response to availability of electron donors and acceptors. Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are regions of the ocean where oxygen (O₂) is naturally depleted. In OMZs microbial communities use alternative terminal electron acceptors such as nitrate, sulfate and carbon dioxide, resulting in fixed nitrogen loss and production of greenhouse gases including methane (CH₄). In this thesis, I explored microbial community structure, dynamics and metabolic interactions as they relate to CH₄ cycling in Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of British Columbia Canada that serves as a model ecosystem for studying microbial processes in OMZs. Leveraging decadal time series observations in Saanich Inlet, I developed a geochemical dataset consisting of nutrient and gas measurements, coupled with multiomic (DNA, RNA and protein) sequence information to chart microbial community structure and dynamics along defined redox gradients. I conducted methods optimization comparing in situ and on-ship sampling  paradigms and used correlation analysis to infer putative microbial interaction networks in relation to water column CH4 oxidation. Methanotrophic bacteria in Saanich Inlet were identified associated with three uncultivated Gammaproteobacteria clades termed OPU1, OPU3 and symbiont-related that partitioned in the water column during periods of prolonged stratification. Water column distribution of the OPU3 clade was found to correlate with nitrite (NO₂-). Based on these results, I conducted incubations with labelled CH₄ and NO₂- to test this correlation and constrain potential metabolic interactions between methanotrophs and other one-carbon utilizing microorganisms under low O₂ conditions. Using multi-omic information derived from these incubations I confirmed the role of OPU3 in coupling CH₄ oxidation to NO₂- red [...]"
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Revision: 3f91094e-dd1e-4b7c-8b35-c7caf035b071
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/3f91094e-dd1e-4b7c-8b35-c7caf035b071.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,48 @@
+title = "Biodiversity management : establishing pre-mining baseline conditions on historical mining disturbances to derive back-casted wildlife habitat suitability model metrics"
+work_id = "rqc5eldx7nh3bcm6zjnql5m2xq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Kyle. H. Knopff"
+given_name = "Kyle. H."
+surname = "Knopff"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "C. W. Franklin"
+given_name = "C. W."
+surname = "Franklin"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "G. L. Luini"
+given_name = "G. L."
+surname = "Luini"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "D. J. Vasiga"
+given_name = "D. J."
+surname = "Vasiga"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "72e79b1252989f4bb91862aecda5ae3122a3ddf2"
+content = "Teck Coal Limited (Teck) is aiming towards a Net Positive Impact (NPI) on biodiversity in the areas where they operate. Teck's NPI target applies to a condition prior to commencement of major mining activities at each operation, and biodiversity losses are measured from this pre-mining condition. Because mining at most of Teck's five Elk Valley operations in southeastern British Columbia has been ongoing for decades, detailed pre-mining ecosystem mapping and inventory and wildlife habitat suitability prior to mining are unavailable. We recreated pre-mining ecosystem conditions using a modified Terrestrial Ecosystem Map (TEM) based on historical aerial imagery combined with available pre-mining data. The TEM permitted further investigation of pre-mining habitat conditions for ten wildlife species using species-specific Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models. This novel approach led to a comprehensive understanding of ecosystem conditions and wildlife habitat in the pre-mining landscape, which enables Teck to quantify biodiversity losses. Mitigation, such as reclamation, will be applied to rehabilitate terrestrial ecosystems that provide habitat function for a wide range of wildlife species, similar to the pre-mining condition. This work provides the foundation for Teck's pursuit of NPI in the Elk Valley and integrates with other novel approaches Teck implements to measure and mitigate adverse impacts to biodiversity."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
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+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374926"
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Revision: 72b65d99-bb67-415f-abb5-8908bbbb9d15
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/72b65d99-bb67-415f-abb5-8908bbbb9d15.toml
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+title = "2nd saloon passenger list"
+work_id = "jac6wznbtrefndx6behb6mos6m"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
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+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Steamships. Atlantic Service"
+role = "author"
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+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "39c31a042bafb0123ebc802d878083705512e11f"
+content = "Passenger list for the Empress of Britain's 19 Apr. 1912 sailing from Liverpool to Quebec."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374901"
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Revision: d49d6a7e-ae5e-4fdc-b2f3-c665281b1bc6
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/d49d6a7e-ae5e-4fdc-b2f3-c665281b1bc6.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "Cablegram to Dr. W. O. Wismer of Spokane"
+work_id = "dqqt4myadvfdvoxkz7e3vakohe"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
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+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Railway Company"
+role = "author"
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+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "9f5105ca454a5eb87705e074ff88e2005d11fb6e"
+content = "Announcing that the Empress of Britain has reached Madeira."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
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+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374913"
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Revision: c4c379af-96ba-4c5c-b7e4-6c8d07c768f9
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/c4c379af-96ba-4c5c-b7e4-6c8d07c768f9.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+title = "Pitchpoling : Moby-Dick, a Speculative History"
+work_id = "lgmq2fsqsbff5kg6eeawu5ymha"
+release_type = "song"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Markus Krajewski"
+given_name = "Markus"
+surname = "Krajewski"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "07df0011391313790c969f641a73fedecc2f0d28"
+content = "Since 2006, an interdisciplinary group of German scholars have met annually to work on an ambitious goal: producing a historically grounded, analytical commentary for each one of Moby-Dick's chapters. This comprehensive, speculative-historical commentary inquires after the colossal importance of Moby-Dick as a work of cultural self-description, while also looking into the ambiguous and conflicted symbol of the novel's white whale. As one of the initiators of the project, Markus Krajewski speaks about the overall scope of the endeavor as well as his own commentary for Chapter 84, \"Pitchpoling.\""
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374914"
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Revision: 5144b1e6-024c-4c15-b743-7f745ae01f30
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/5144b1e6-024c-4c15-b743-7f745ae01f30.toml
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+title = "Rate-control quotient of mineral dissolution from waste rock dumps"
+work_id = "v56dnli63zclxdu5wc4rwveykq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Liu, Zhong-Sheng (Simon)"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Cheng Huang"
+given_name = "Cheng"
+surname = "Huang"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Liang Ma"
+given_name = "Liang"
+surname = "Ma"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Eben Dy"
+given_name = "Eben"
+surname = "Dy"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 4
+raw_name = "Zhong Xie"
+given_name = "Zhong"
+surname = "Xie"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 5
+raw_name = "Kidus Tufa"
+given_name = "Kidus"
+surname = "Tufa"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 6
+raw_name = "Elizabeth Fisher"
+given_name = "Elizabeth"
+surname = "Fisher"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 7
+raw_name = "James Zhou"
+given_name = "James"
+surname = "Zhou"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 8
+raw_name = "Kevin Morin"
+given_name = "Kevin"
+surname = "Morin"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 9
+raw_name = "Mike Aziz"
+given_name = "Mike"
+surname = "Aziz"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 10
+raw_name = "Cody Meints"
+given_name = "Cody"
+surname = "Meints"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 11
+raw_name = "Mike O'Kane"
+given_name = "Mike"
+surname = "O'Kane"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 12
+raw_name = "Lindsay Tallon"
+given_name = "Lindsay"
+surname = "Tallon"
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+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "b9b0812b6bd0ec04fce0daa58c8afa6b852885ae"
+content = "Rain-water and/or snow-melt water infiltrate into or through waste rock dumps at mine sites and dissolve minerals (salts) from rock surfaces. Collecting and treating the drainage is required to meet mine-water-discharge regulations. Generally speaking, less solute loadings in the collected drainage would mean lower cost (e.g., less lime consumption). Thus it is important to identify the rate-control mechanisms of mineral dissolution under different storage configurations of waste rock dumps. In this paper, the authors present an analysis of rate-control mechanisms. The main point is the rate of water-infiltration Q relative to the rate of solute production (kβλ), i.e., (kβλ)/Q. Here k represents the effective kinetic constant of a mineral species' dissolution from a rock surface, β represents rock dump depth, and λ represents the sum of rock surface areas that are flushed by infiltrated water within a unit volume of rocks. One significance of the quotient (kβλ)/Q is its quantitative indication of the rate-control mechanisms. When (kβλ)/Q becomes smaller, say (kβλ)/Q <0.5, the rate of solute production becomes in control because the solute loading is nearly independent of water-infiltration rate Q; when (kβλ)/Q becomes larger, say (kβλ)/Q > 2.5, infiltration rate Q is in control, that is, the solute concentration would become close to the saturation concentration of the mineral species and the solute loading would become proportional to infiltration rate Q; when 0.5 < (kβλ)/Q < 2.5, both water-infiltration rate Q and the rate of solute production (kβλ) are in control, a mixed control mechanism."
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Revision: d88efe4b-4ebf-4ba9-9813-58aa7d039557
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/d88efe4b-4ebf-4ba9-9813-58aa7d039557.toml
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+title = "\"Still learning and evolving in our approaches\": patient and stakeholder engagement among Canadian community-based primary health care researchers"
+work_id = "sy4ng7pmz5gb7mk6whvexgwjha"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "BioMed Central"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Claire Kendall"
+given_name = "Claire"
+surname = "Kendall"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Michael Fitzgerald"
+given_name = "Michael"
+surname = "Fitzgerald"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Rachel S Kang"
+given_name = "Rachel S"
+surname = "Kang"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Sabrina T Wong"
+given_name = "Sabrina T"
+surname = "Wong"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 4
+raw_name = "Alan Katz"
+given_name = "Alan"
+surname = "Katz"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 5
+raw_name = "Martin Fortin"
+given_name = "Martin"
+surname = "Fortin"
+role = "author"
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+[[contribs]]
+index = 6
+raw_name = "Emilie Dionne"
+given_name = "Emilie"
+surname = "Dionne"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 7
+raw_name = "Kerry Kuluski"
+given_name = "Kerry"
+surname = "Kuluski"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 8
+raw_name = "Mary A O'Brien"
+given_name = "Mary A"
+surname = "O'Brien"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 9
+raw_name = "Jenny Ploeg"
+given_name = "Jenny"
+surname = "Ploeg"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 10
+raw_name = "Lois Crowe"
+given_name = "Lois"
+surname = "Crowe"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 11
+raw_name = "Clare Liddy"
+given_name = "Clare"
+surname = "Liddy"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "8df50a06f6dfb1dcdd4b251df9d8bffb86bd62ce"
+content = "Plain English summary:                  Increasingly, health researchers are conducting their research in partnership with non-researchers such as patients and caregivers, advocacy groups, clinicians, and policymakers. The idea behind this partnership is to make research more relevant and appropriate. However, so far there is not much evidence about how this partnership or engagement actually affects research. We conducted an online survey of 12 teams in Canada that have engaged patients and other stakeholders in community based health research, partly as a requirement to obtain funding. We found that in many cases, the teams have engaged a wide variety and large number of stakeholders, and have involved them in many different stages of their research. Teams reported that their overall experience of this approach to research has been positive, but some challenges have been encountered along the way. Some teams found that it was difficult to communicate appropriately with all the stakeholders, and to keep them informed when research was going slowly. Other teams had trouble finding government representatives to work with. Several teams noted that engagement is time-consuming, and requires a lot of effort. Nevertheless, all teams reported that they had learned from the experience, and found it valuable. As a result, Canadian health care researchers are better positioned to engage with patients and other stakeholders in the future.                      Background:                                    Patient and other stakeholder engagement in research is increasingly important, but there is limited evidence of its impact. In 2013, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research launched a five-year Community Based Primary Health Care (CBPHC) initiative that funded 12 teams for innovative approaches to primary health care involving engagement with patients, communities, decision-makers, and clinicians across jurisdictions in Canada. The present study examines the extent of engagement by these teams, and the factors that af [...]"
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+doi = "10.14288/1.0374949"
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Revision: da6e15ca-56f5-4563-9e11-ca2c5863ed5a
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/da6e15ca-56f5-4563-9e11-ca2c5863ed5a.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+title = "The effect of physical activity on depression risk and quality of life in men"
+work_id = "cj7itsw5kjfnzdlbgbst44kamm"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Ryley Gregory Price"
+given_name = "Ryley Gregory"
+surname = "Price"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "6523380aeb8a631db2cb4feaa7cd53ca4f7416f6"
+content = "Physical activity (PA) is a key measure for preventing multiple chronic health conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and poor mental health. Specific to mental health, increased PA has been associated with a decrease in depression risk and depressive symptomology, reductions in anxiety and stress as well as improved mood and overall cognitive function. Despite the physical and mental health benefits associated with PA, men's PA levels remain low. It has been suggested that this may be due to the inability to develop programs that consider masculine values and ideals. Many health promotion programs hold little 'manly' appeal and consequently fail to influence men's health promoting behaviour. Recent research has highlighted the potential for tailored, gender-sensitised programs to reach and engage men. Thus, the purpose of this research was to examine the impact of the HAT TRICK gender-sensitised PA intervention on risk of depression and quality of life (QoL) in men. HAT TRICK was a 12-week, 90-minute face to face, intervention that focused on PA, healthy eating and social connectedness in inactive and overweight men. Data were collected at baseline and at the completion of the program (12-weeks) and included PA, assessed by the Godin Leisure Time Questionnaire; Risk of Depression, assessed using the Male Depression Risk Scale; and QoL, assessed via the SF-12. Demographic and anthropometric measures were also collected. Paired samples t-tests and multiple regression were used to analyse the data. Results showed a significant increase in PA over time (p=0.000), with a mean increase of 213.86 minutes per week.  There was also a significant positive change in depression risk levels over time (p=0.000), and significant improvement in QoL over time (p=0.002). The results of this thesis provide more evidence for the importance of PA interventions for men's mental and physical health."
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+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374917"
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Revision: a950a9df-6b27-4342-afd8-04b08c6108d2
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/a950a9df-6b27-4342-afd8-04b08c6108d2.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+title = "Numerical investigation of transition and turbulence in planar and axisymmetric expansions"
+work_id = "vwilgl44u5gbtanr5txyu6tp7m"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Nima Moallemi"
+given_name = "Nima"
+surname = "Moallemi"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "3f4f7bdd8128df9a3d0324b600821d2e06c3ddfb"
+content = "This thesis documents a series of complementary numerical investigations aimed at understanding the flow instability, transition, and laminarization process through planar and axisymmetric expansions. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to accurately resolve the spatial and temporal scales of the simulated flows.  The first investigation addresses the mechanisms for the initial onset of flow instability in planar expansions at low Reynolds numbers. Various expansion ratios are studied using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations at flow Reynolds numbers up to 5000 and expansion ratios in the range of 1.33 to 4.00. Correlations are developed for the non-dimensional reattachment length and the maximum velocity magnitude in the reverse-flow region in terms of Reynolds numbers and expansion ratios. Bifurcation phenomena resulting in the loss of flow symmetry downstream of the sudden expansion is observed and critical Reynolds numbers for the onset of bifurcation for various expansion ratios are identified. The growth and decay mechanisms of the localized turbulence are analyzed through the transport budgets of instantaneous vorticity.  The effect of transverse jets on the bifurcation and instability of the flow in planar expansions is examined. Transverse injections cause increased levels of mixing and fluctuations downstream of the flow by generating localized disturbances through the activation of inviscid instability modes in the transverse flow.   Finally, the dynamics of turbulent flow in a gradual axisymmetric expansion is investigated. Turbulent inflow is generated in a precursor simulation of a periodic pipe with an annular rib roughness. Validation is accomplished in terms of published mean velocity profile, velocity defect, and fluctuation amplitudes as well as near-wall power spectra. Turbulence from the precursor study is passed to the gradual expansion to examine the downstream growth and decay of turbulence. This process is described in terms of the evolution of the Reynolds stress tensor in [...]"
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374918"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 6067aba5-e689-46cc-ada5-569e04378334
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/6067aba5-e689-46cc-ada5-569e04378334.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,34 @@
+title = "Best management practices for whitebark pine management mining and mineral exploration"
+work_id = "y6uyox3wezgcvb7hsdkvxy2d34"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Randy Moody"
+given_name = "Randy"
+surname = "Moody"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Michael Keefer"
+given_name = "Michael"
+surname = "Keefer"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "6b89ebfa3890206e4079b6eaffb8ee50b2530616"
+content = "Whitebark pine is a species of five needle pine that is found broaly at high elevations in BC roughly south of the Yellowhead Highway. Within BC the species is currently Blue Listed and in Canada is listed as Endangered indicating a substantial conservation concern, its primary threats are white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, fire suppression and climate change. Mining and other industrial activities have the potential to further damage the species through habitat loss yet with good planning may to provide benefits to the long-term survival of the species through the use of best management practices. Key means for the mining sector to create a net-benefit for whitebark pine include funding blister rust screening, seed collections, planting in reclamation and habitat offsetting."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374931"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 6fc16dd9-a036-4db8-bcd5-510424753581
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/6fc16dd9-a036-4db8-bcd5-510424753581.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+title = "2nd saloon passenger list"
+work_id = "2mnig5od6nd2zls2jkxb5rb3uq"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Canadian Pacific Steamships. Atlantic Service"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "0d7d1eba4dc30c85050442d27af171590e316395"
+content = "Passenger list for the Empress of Britain's 17 Jun. 1910 sailing from Liverpool to Quebec."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374912"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: b35fa45d-6af7-4344-a9d9-90abc862a8da
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/b35fa45d-6af7-4344-a9d9-90abc862a8da.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,48 @@
+title = "Including mine rock facility design to enhance progressive reclamation"
+work_id = "7gwmdrv55zeozehlirr5pej4pm"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "The University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Greg Meiers"
+given_name = "Greg"
+surname = "Meiers"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 1
+raw_name = "Mark Phillip"
+given_name = "Mark"
+surname = "Phillip"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 2
+raw_name = "Tyler Birkham"
+given_name = "Tyler"
+surname = "Birkham"
+role = "author"
+
+[[contribs]]
+index = 3
+raw_name = "Mike O'Kane"
+given_name = "Mike"
+surname = "O'Kane"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "b12e9e846e0d7e997da7481d185b2497fe12003f"
+content = "While the exact language may vary, progressive mine reclamation is similarly defined across the mining industry, yet the consensus is that it represents \"best available technology\" for reducing environmental risks at closure and optimizing closure costs. In terms of mine rock storage facilities (MRSFs) that contain potentially acid generating material, the current industry practices and the majority of guidance documents focus on phased cover system construction and revegetation.  This paper examines whether an enhanced methodology can be applied for progressively reclaiming MRSFs during construction to change the typical physical environment in which sulfide materials are placed. The MRSFs are designed using mine rock placement strategies that focus managing gas transport as the MRSFs are being constructed. This approach limits sulfide oxidation and generation of stored acidity, increases longevity of any available alkalinity, and thus moves us closer to the essence of progressive reclamation than the typical approach.  General illustrative modeling examples and a case study are provided to illustrate MRSF design methodology."
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374929"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"
Revision: 2321af94-0216-4b42-8ebd-ce2a3944b365
--- (created)
+++ /release/rev/2321af94-0216-4b42-8ebd-ce2a3944b365.toml
@@ -0,0 +1,27 @@
+title = "Effects of perinatal loss on British Columbian obstetric nurses"
+work_id = "i6x5qtx5vfhpni2uum64cvkwu4"
+release_type = "article-journal"
+release_stage = "published"
+release_year = 2018
+publisher = "University of British Columbia"
+language = "en"
+refs = []
+[[contribs]]
+index = 0
+raw_name = "Adisa Devic"
+given_name = "Adisa"
+surname = "Devic"
+role = "author"
+
+[[abstracts]]
+sha1 = "96f9d1b7e8f661e284a6e51b8c6afd02aa1976ad"
+content = "Background: Perinatal loss is a common occurrence on obstetric units. The effects of perinatal loss are far reaching and have profound effects on the families experiencing it, and on the nurses who care for them. Explorations of what exactly these effects are on the nursing staff providing bereavement care is lacking. Purpose: To explore the experiences of obstetric nurses who have provided care to families undergoing a perinatal loss. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design informed by principles of interpretive phenomenology was used to explore the effects of perinatal loss on nurses. A purposive sampling technique included eight nurses. Open-ended questions using a semi-structured approach guided the interviews. Results: The eight nurses interviewed were unanimous in their descriptions of how the lack of support and time to care for families experiencing perinatal loss significantly impacted their own experiences of providing care. Both positive and negative experiences were shared about the impacts of perinatal loss; yet when support and time were lacking, participants reported significant negative effects. Conversely, when nurses had adequate supports in place and the time to spend with their bereaved patient, as well as time for self-care, positive experiences were described. Finally, participants described perinatal bereavement work as highly valuable work, for which their involvement was considered a privilege.  Implications: This study highlights the importance of education, preparation and support for nurses within the context of perinatal loss. The study findings point to the importance of resourcing support and prioritizing the time needed for nurses to minimize the negative effects of caring for families experiencing perinatal loss. It also highlights that strategies need to be in place for nurses to support each other to promote experiences that are more positive. Nurse leaders emerged in the study as a significant resource for shaping a climate of care and perinatal practice to mitigate the negat [...]"
+mimetype = "text/plain"
+lang = "en"
+
+[ext_ids]
+doi = "10.14288/1.0374948"
+
+[extra.datacite]
+resourceType = "Text"
+resourceTypeGeneral = "Text"

Work Edit Diffs (50)



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